Online Editorials

Shall we ‘Go with the Grain’?

(May 25th, 2016) Porridge with milk – and a look of displeasure – this is how many of our childhood mornings looked like. However, a new science-backed cookbook shows that oats and barley can be both healthy and delicious alternatives to rice or pasta.

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The Magic Trick Lies in the Eye of the Beholder

(May 23rd, 2016) How do magicians deceive their audience? It’s all a matter of manipulating our attention, say two neuroscientists from the UK and Japan.

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The Ethics of Peer Review: The End? (5/5)

(May 19th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity.

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The Ethics of Peer Review: ‘Open’ Reviewing (4/5)

(May 17th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity.

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The Ethics of Peer Review: Principles (3/5)

(May 13th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity.

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The Ethics of Peer Review: Problems (2/5)

(May 11th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity.

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The Ethics of Peer Review: History (1/5)

(May 10th, 2016) Peer review is at the heart of research communication. However, the process is far from perfect and many problems have been identified. Among them, ethical questions about the responsible conduct of reviewers who can wield considerable power behind a cloak of anonymity.

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Cute but Dangerous

(May 2nd, 2016) Moth larvae might not have swords or shotguns to defend themselves against predators but they invented another, as effective strategy. (Warning: This article contains graphic scenes of gruesome behaviour!)

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Orca Linguistics

(April 28th, 2016) Killer whales use sound to navigate and communicate. They converse in vocal dialects, a unique repertoire of calls shared by each pod of whales. By using an agent-based computer model of call evolution, Scottish scientists analysed which factors influence the whales' language.

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Videogames against Malaria

(April 26th, 2016) Spanish researchers at the Technical University of Madrid develop a Malaria "Candy Crush" game to research new diagnostic tools.

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Bioprinting Thick Vascularised Tissues

(April 22nd, 2016) We've all seen the impact 3D printing has had. But have you wondered what it would be like if we could 3D print living tissues? Wonder no longer – it turns out we already can.

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The Divine Rise of Ultra-Sociality

(April 20th, 2016) Is sociality written in our genes? A game of dice suggests that all it needs for humans to cooperate is an all-seeing, moral and punitive god.

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Look Sharp... and See!

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Publication Analysis 2007-2013: Clinical Neuroscience

Current Issue - Publication AnalysisLondon is the Mecca for neurologists, including Europe's top neuroscientist. He and several of his highly-cited colleagues study Alzheimer's disease, the discipline's hottest topic... more

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Current Issue - MethodsDeep learning algorithms, applied by computer scientists to "teach" machines, are inspired by the brain's neuronal networks. So why not use deep learning approaches to tackle biological problems?... more

Tips and tricks of the trade: 3D-Printed Microscope

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