Online Editorials

10 Years ‘European Charter for Researchers’ (Part 3/3 - The Charter's Achievements)

(May 29th, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the ‘European Charter for Researchers’. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims?

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10 Years ‘European Charter for Researchers’ (Part 2/3 - The Charter's Intentions)

(May 26th, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the ‘European Charter for Researchers’. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims?

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10 Years ‘European Charter for Researchers’ (Part 1/3 - History of the Charter)

(May 21st, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the ‘European Charter for Researchers’. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March, it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims?

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Biomarker Failure

(May 15th, 2015) miRNAs are considered important molecules for the prediction of cancer. However, a new study suggests that, at the moment, miRNAs do not provide data reliable enough for the identification of early stage melanoma.

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Noble Advice

(May 12th, 2015) There are many science prizes around these days but the Nobel Prize is still the most prestigious. Nobel laureate Richard Roberts compiled ten rules (some more serious than others) one has to ‘obey’ to get that call from Stockholm one day.

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Phages to the Rescue

(May 8th, 2015) With antibiotic resistance becoming an ever-growing threat, the search for alternative therapies and their clinical application is more important than ever. The P.H.A.G.E. foundation is currently working towards that goal.

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Is It Too Soon?

(May 5th, 2015) A recent study on human germline gene editing has thrown the scientific world into turmoil. Many wonder: ”Are we ready to cross that line?” We asked Christine Mummery, member of the International Human Embryonic Research Guidelines Task Force, for her opinion.

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Wake up and Smell the Pheromones

(May 2nd, 2015) Is human behaviour controlled by pheromones or not? This is still a controversial topic. Tristram Wyatt has his own ideas about the past, present and future of human pheromone research and shares them with us.

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Print your Lab

(April 28th, 2015) Sharing is a good thing and, in some cases, it can even power public science engagement. Researchers at the University of Tübingen have taken open source, 3D printed lab equipment to developing countries.

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Confessions of a Postdoc (23): The Road Less Travelled… Until Now

(April 24th, 2015) Since 2010, Anjana Nityanandam has shared her inner thoughts, experiences and feelings that come with being a postdoc. Here are her latest insights into the world of a research scientist that many are probably all too familiar with.

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A Delicate Question

(April 21st, 2015) If you’re ever faced with the possibility of finding out about the genetic information of a close relative, who passed away, would you want to know? Biomedical ethicists discuss the pros and cons of disclosing genetic information of deceased patients.

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Trust is Good, Control is Better

(April 17th, 2015) US and European scientists recently dropped a bombshell on research involving the miracle fat-burning hormone, irisin. Their case is a perfect example for demonstrating the overreliance on commercially available test kits.

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