Online Editorials Archive - 2015



Chocolate Flavours Unlocked by Yeast: A Sweet Story!

Red(December 21st, 2015) It’s the most wonderful time of the year, especially for chocolate lovers. A delicious study by Belgian scientists revealed that yeast strains involved in cocoa bean fermentation can modulate the resulting chocolate’s flavour, unlocking a whole new world of chocolate aromas! more

A Different Way to Look at Tadpoles, Ferns and Sharks

Red(December 18th, 2015) For the very first time, the UK’s Royal Society launched a photo competition. The winning images are both aesthetic and educational, showing well-known creatures from new perspectives. more

Microbial Inventory

Red(December 16th, 2015) What bacteria grow on Arabidopsis’ roots and leaves? German and Swiss scientists catalogued the plant’s prokaryotic life partners and thus established a new model system to study plant microbiota. more

Prized Paper

Red(December 14th, 2015) What is your favourite scientific paper from last year? The PLOS Genetics editorial team recently picked their winner: E. coli adaptation to a novel environment by scientists from the Gulbenkian Institute in Portugal. more

Open or Blind?

Red(December 11th, 2015) Do you think the peer review process is fair? How should the reviewers be picked? A recent study examined whether the scores and quality of reviews were affected by the author suggesting the reviewer, or by the reviewers name being known to the authors. more

Hunting Down Huntington

Red(December 9th, 2015) At present, there are no treatments available to cure or slow the progression of the neurodegenerative genetic disorder, Huntington’s Disease (HD). However, a new gene-silencing drug is currently being trialled and may soon change this situation. more

The D in PhD

Red(December 7th, 2015) Ballet, hiphop or acro yoga – complex, scientific issues can be explained through dance, or can they? We talked to this year's winners of the Dance your PhD contest to find out whether dance is really the right language when talking about science. more

Confessions of a Postdoc (25): The Interview

Red(December 3rd, 2015) Since 2010, Anjana Nityanandam has shared her inner thoughts, experiences and feelings that come with being a postdoc. Here are her latest insights into the world of a research scientist that many are probably all too familiar with. more

Steaks for Veggies

Red(December 1st, 2015) Wageningen University researchers have developed a meat replacement product that feels like the real thing. At a recent media event, they presented their 7 kg giant beefsteak made out of soy bean protein. more

New EC Science Advice Mechanism Appoints Seven High Level Advisers

Red(November 27th, 2015) To help advise it on science, the European Commission has introduced a new science advice mechanism headed by a high level group of seven science advisors who have been selected from the highest echelons of European science. Jeremy Garwood reports. more

“Bibliometricians are really the curse of the age”

Red(November 24th, 2015) Once a successful pharmacologist, working on ion channels with amongst others Nobelist Bert Sakmann, David Colquhoun now focuses on calling out shortcomings in the scientific world. LT author Jeremy Garwood talked to him, here’s the full interview. more

UK’s Boast of Enhanced Research Excellence ‘Lacks Credibility’ (Part 2 of 2)

Red(November 20th, 2015) The UK’s periodic evaluation of its university research has triumphantly reported a doubling of its top-class research results during the previous 6 years, but a reanalysis of the data has found a much lower result. more

UK's Boast of Enhanced Research Excellence 'Lacks Credibility' (Part 1 of 2)

Red(November 16th, 2015) The UK’s periodic evaluation of its university research has triumphantly reported a doubling of its top-class research results during the previous 6 years, but a reanalysis of the data has found a much lower result. more

Cream of the Crop in Life Sciences

Red(November 10th, 2015) Whatever one may think about global university rankings, they provide some sort of indication of excellent research hotspots. Times Higher Education recently released its latest list. Where’s THE’s best place to work for life scientists? more

Blind Passengers

Red(November 6th, 2015) Have you ever wondered how pure congenic or knockout mice really are? A recent study showed that many unwanted mutations, so-called passenger mutations, accompany the intended genetic modifications, resulting in confounding effects that can have serious impacts on experimental results. more

A new Science(ability)?

Red(November 2nd, 2015) Big Data, Innovation, Personalised Medicine and co. – Are these the hallmarks of a new science(ability) in medicine? An essay by Gerd Antes, Freiburg. more

How to Solve Data Merging Problems

Red(October 30th, 2015) As the bioinformatics field continues to grow and evolve, the amount of data being generated is increasing exponentially. A recent review discusses the problems and possible solutions to the sharing and integration of this data. more

The Biosynthetic Jamboree

Red(October 27th, 2015) "And the winner is…" The world's biggest synthetic biology contest, the International Genetically Engineered Machine (iGEM) Competition, ended last month in Boston. The discoveries are now waiting to be transformed into start-up companies or full research projects. more

A Call for British Scientists to Oppose Brexit

Red(October 23rd, 2015) At the beginning of this month, Mike Galsworthy and Rob Davidson officially launched their grassroots campaign 'Scientists for EU'. The two researchers want to mobilise the scientific community to advocate the UK's continued EU membership. more

Important but not Valued Enough

Red(October 21st, 2015) At the beginning of this month, Mike Galsworthy and Rob Davidson officially launched their grassroots campaign 'Scientists for EU'. The two researchers want to mobilise the scientific community to advocate the UK's continued EU membership. more

Sperm Adventures in 3D

Red(October 16th, 2015) For decades, scientists have tried to understand how sperm manage to undertake the journey towards the female egg. Now, for the first time, a research group in Bonn followed these male cells in three-dimensional space providing new insights about their navigation strategies. more

Risk vs Gain

Red(October 13th, 2015) It was headline-grabbing news. A British scientist applied for permission to genetically modify human embryos for research purposes. Will this technology ever be used in the clinic? more

Nobel Prize for Repairmen

Red(October 8th, 2015) Two biochemists and a medical scientist win this year’s Nobel Prize for Chemistry. Tomas Lindahl, Paul Modrich and Aziz Sancar taught us how cells repair damaged DNA, brought upon them through oxidation, UV radiation or cell division. more

Nobel Prize for Parasite Killers

Red(October 6th, 2015) The Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine 2015 is shared equally by Youyou Tu for discovering the anti-malaria compound artemisinin, and Satoshi Omura and William Campbell for discovering a drug against parasitic worms. more

Open Doors

Red(October 1st, 2015) From providing food and shelter to collecting clothes and toys, help for refugees arriving in Europe currently adopts various forms. German universities do their share by setting up special programmes to support the start of a new and better life for many of them. more

Kiss me I'm a Scientist

Red(September 29th, 2015) This year’s Ig Nobel Prizes honour studies on mammalian urination mechanisms, the promiscuousness of a mediaeval emperor and the health benefits and possible applications of kissing research. more

The Science of Science Advice - Communicating and Using the Advice (6)

Red(September 15th, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - Producing the Advice (5)

Red(September 22nd, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - Selecting the Advisors (4)

Red(September 18th, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - The Advisory Question (3)

Red(September 15th, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

Take a Walk on the Inspirational Side

Red(September 9th, 2015) With a little practice, the next flash of wit is just around the corner. You just have to take a walk there, as a new study suggests. more

Stem Cell Research in Colourful Pictures

Red(September 8th, 2015) Do you find it hard to explain your research to your non-biologist family and friends? If so, and you happen to study stem cells, there’s a solution: An entertaining and informative comic book, written by a Portuguese researcher. more

Creating Textbook Knowledge over Pizza

Red(September 3rd, 2015) The endosymbiotic theory has been around for nearly 150 years. And although it gives answers to many questions on evolution, some of them still remain unanswered. A recent discovery unlocks a handful of these mysteries and further supports the theory’s reliability. more

Famous Name

Red(August 30th, 2015) In Indonesia and Japan, researchers discover new species requiring scientific names and are inspired by music and research. more

Publisher Problems at Frontiers (Part 2)

Red(August 25th, 2015) The failed alliance with the Nature Publishing Group also plays a role in the conflict between the Frontiers publishing company and a group of its editors. more

Science, Done better

Red(August 21st, 2015) Reproducibility of published data is an ongoing problem in the scientific world. A new “Minimum Standards of Reporting Checklist” provides comprehensive guidelines to researchers, funders, and publishers. The checklist was launched by BioMed Central last month. more

Bionic Vision Becomes a Reality

Red(August 17th, 2015) As the population ages blindness will become more prevalent, mostly due to retinal diseases. At present no effective treatments exist, but the Argus II bionic retinal eye implant is able to provide some vision restoration. more

Greece’s Debt Crisis Torments Scientists

Red(August 13th, 2015) Christos Georgiou, biochemist at the University of Patras, gives us a first-hand report on the current situation in his home country. more

Publisher Problems at Frontiers (Part 1)

Red(August 9th, 2015) Frontiers, the publishing house, dismisses 31 of its editors, based on escalated opposition to the publisher’s unique publication model. more

Life in the Extreme

Red(August 5th, 2015) What's life like in the deep sea? Ronnie Glud of the Southern Danish University and his team are going to investigate. The biogeochemist recently received a multi-million euro grant from the European Research Council to explore some major trenches in the ocean. more

Ecology + Music = Sex & Bugs & Rock 'n Roll

Red(June 31st, 2015) Do you like music festivals? Do you enjoy science as well? Ecologists from Lancaster University present the solution: visit their wildflower-meadow-themed stall “Sex & Bugs & Rock 'n Roll” at various music festivals throughout the UK and enjoy ecology as much as you can bear! more

Confessions of a Postdoc (24): Watch What you Say...

Red(July 28th, 2015) Since 2010, Anjana Nityanandam has shared her inner thoughts, experiences and feelings that come with being a postdoc. Here are her latest insights into the world of a research scientist that many are probably all too familiar with. more

The Science of Science Advice - The Art of Science Advice (2)

Red(July 24th, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Science of Science Advice - Models of Science Advice (1)

Red(July 21st, 2015) Many government decisions have a scientific element. But who decides what kind of scientific advice will be used? How it is presented to the politicians and citizens they represent? Jeremy Garwood looks at the rise of the ‘Science of Science Advice’. more

The Number of Young Scientists has Recently Decreased by a Third

Red(July 17th, 2015) Once a flourishing empire in the East, the Ukraine is going through some difficult times at the moment. The political instability also affects science. We talked to Roman Bezus, associate professor at Dnipropretrovsk State University of Agriculture and Economics. more

The "Voinnet Case": Incorrect Measures for Incorrect Figures?

Red(July 12th, 2015) Formal investigations by the ETH Zürich and the French CNRS identified numerous incorrect figures in about twenty publications by plant biologist Olivier Voinnet. Nevertheless, he is to keep his laboratory and professorship at the ETH. Hard to understand, as many colleagues express their astonishment. more

The "Voinnet Case": Correct Corrections?

Red(July 7th, 2015) Aside from one retraction, eight articles of ETH Zürich plant biologist Olivier Voinnet have been corrected by the journals so far. Large parts of the scientific community, however, are not exactly satisfied with them. more

One Billion Shipping Containers

Red(July 10th, 2015) Have you ever wondered how much total DNA there is on Earth? Researchers in Edinburgh tortured their calculators and found a mind-blowing answer. more

Proximity-Dependent Initiation of Hybridization Chain Reaction (proxHCR)

Red(July 3rd, 2015) In this month's Nature Communications, Ola Söderberg's lab at the Uppsala University report a rather unusual way of investigating protein-protein interactions using an enzyme-free DNA technology called the Hybridisation Chain Reaction. more

Sensitive Noses in the Hospital

Red(June 30th, 2015) Detecting dangerous infections and even cancer in its early stages is important but not easy. Luckily, clinical science can increasingly rely on man’s best friends, dogs. more

Research Crisis in Ireland – The Current Situation (2)

Red(June 26th, 2015) Researchers in Ireland are protesting against existing Irish government funding policies that exclude basic science in favour of short-term economic potential. Jeremy Garwood about demotivated scientists and calls for change. more

Research Crisis in Ireland – The Background (1)

Red(June 23rd, 2015) Researchers in Ireland are protesting against existing Irish government funding policies that exclude basic science in favour of short-term economic potential. Jeremy Garwood talks to plant geneticist, Frank Wellmer, at Trinity College Dublin. more

Dispatches from the US

Red(June 19th, 2015) In this month’s news: US universities lead the number of patent applications; scientists create the first map of airborne pathogens; Science Academies hope to restrict the use of revolutionary gene editing tool and brain regions involved with creativity have been identified. more

Money for Everybody

Red(June 16th, 2015) For students, navigating the maze of different funding opportunities is often overwhelming. As a result, nearly 20% of scholarships available throughout Europe are never actually claimed. The new platform European Funding Guide aims to close this gap. more

Retract... or correct... or retract...

Red(June 10th, 2015) An Oncogene paper was found to contain manipulated data. Four years later, the different players are still fighting about the appropriate way to handle it. Coincidentally, one of them is a former postdoc of ETH Zürich plant biologist Olivier Voinnet — and thus also deeply involved in the current misconduct investigations of his papers. more

Strong Unions Needed

Red(June 8th, 2015) Animal research is necessary. But misconceptions in the public make the use of animal models increasingly difficult. What can be done to improve the reputation of animal research? The European Animal Research Association proposes a Unified Animal Research Network in Europe. more

Clean up your Act!

Red(June 2nd, 2015) A new book about marine litter wants to illustrate how serious the matter is — not only for marine wildlife but also for our own health. We need to intensify research on this issue, says Tamara Galloway, one of the book’s authors. more

10 Years 'European Charter for Researchers' (Part 3/3 - History of the Charter)

Red(May 29th, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the 'European Charter for Researchers'. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March, it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims? more

10 Years 'European Charter for Researchers' (Part 2/3 - History of the Charter)

Red(May 16th, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the 'European Charter for Researchers'. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March, it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims? more

10 Years 'European Charter for Researchers' (Part 1/3 - History of the Charter)

Red(May 21st, 2015) In 2005, the European Commission published the 'European Charter for Researchers'. One of its main aims was to define scientific research as a recognised profession with a clear professional career structure. In March, it celebrated its 10th anniversary, but has it achieved its aims? more

Biomarker Failure

Red(May 15th, 2015) miRNAs are considered important molecules for the prediction of cancer. However, a new study suggests that, at the moment, miRNAs do not provide data reliable enough for the identification of early stage melanoma. more

Noble Advice

Red(May 12th, 2015) There are many science prizes around these days but the Nobel Prize is still the most prestigious. Nobel laureate Richard Roberts compiled ten rules (some more serious than others) one has to ‘obey’ to get that call from Stockholm one day. more

Phages to the Rescue

Red(May 8th, 2015) With antibiotic resistance becoming an ever-growing threat, the search for alternative therapies and their clinical application is more important than ever. The P.H.A.G.E. foundation is currently working towards that goal. more

Is It Too Soon?

Red(May 5th, 2015) A recent study on human germline gene editing has thrown the scientific world into turmoil. Many wonder: ”Are we ready to cross that line?” We asked Christine Mummery, member of the International Human Embryonic Research Guidelines Task Force, for her opinion. more

Wake up and Smell the Pheromones

Red(May 2nd, 2015) Is human behaviour controlled by pheromones or not? This is still a controversial topic. Tristram Wyatt has his own ideas about the past, present and future of human pheromone research and shares them with us. more

Print your Lab

Red(April 28th, 2015) Sharing is a good thing and, in some cases, it can even power public science engagement. Researchers at the University of Tübingen have taken open source, 3D printed lab equipment to developing countries. more

Confessions of a Postdoc (23): The Road Less Travelled… Until Now

Red(April 24th, 2015) Since 2010, Anjana Nityanandam has shared her inner thoughts, experiences and feelings that come with being a postdoc. Here are her latest insights into the world of a research scientist that many are probably all too familiar with. more

A Delicate Question

Red(April 21st, 2015) If you’re ever faced with the possibility of finding out about the genetic information of a close relative, who passed away, would you want to know? Biomedical ethicists discuss the pros and cons of disclosing genetic information of deceased patients. more

Trust is Good, Control is Better

Red(April 17th, 2015) US and European scientists recently dropped a bombshell on research involving the miracle fat-burning hormone, irisin. Their case is a perfect example for demonstrating the overreliance on commercially available test kits. more

The “Voinnet Case”: Background of a Retraction plus an Open Letter

Red(April 13th, 2015) Following the accusations of scientific misconduct against plant biologist Olivier Voinnet from the ETH Zürich, his first paper is about to be retracted. Furthermore, the official statements by Voinnet's current and former employers prompted an open letter (see at the end of the article). more

Bibliometrical Benefits

Red(April 13th, 2015) Irish researchers performed the first bibliometric analysis of the evolution of a research field. From the primitive beginnings some twenty years ago to the complex present, the miRNA field has evolved into a truly remarkable form. more

Laughing and Thinking in Copenhagen

Red(April 8th, 2015) Marc Abrahams and his IgNobel clique once again toured Europe. Live on stage: a student stops his nose bleed with bacon, a professor dresses as a polar bear and we get convinced that it is mentally hazardous for a human to own a cat. Lab Times reporter Karin Lauschke has the details. more

The Big Egg Hunt

Red(April 2nd, 2015) A group of scientists makes an unexpected discovery on Easter Island. Is there a new member sitting on a side branch of the avian family tree? more

Micropia: the Museum of Small Things

Red(March 31st, 2015) They are all around you, even if you often cannot see them: microbes! And now, they also have their own museum. Alejandra Manjarrez checked it out. more

A Crosstalk between Genes and the Environment is also Present in Music

Red(March 27th, 2015) Does listening to music affect gene expression? Are you a born musician? Irma Järvelä, Associate Professor in Medical Molecular Genetics at the University of Helsinki, Finland, tries to find answers. Isabel Torres spoke to her about Mozart, transcriptomics and Jazz. more

Too Much to be Nothing?

Red(March 24th, 2015) Already at an early age, Olivier Voinnet had achieved star status among plant biologists – until suspicions arose last year that more than 30 of his publications contained dubious images. Voinnet’s colleagues are shocked – and demand an explanation. more

Diagnostic Error

Red(March 20th, 2015) Everyone studying neuroscience knows Henry Molaison or at least his initials, H.M. His epilepsy and post-surgery amnesia was the base for numerous scientific publications. A recent study, however, finds that HM’s disease was most probably misdiagnosed.more

On the Origin of Hippos

Red(March 17th, 2015) They look like pigs but their genetic make-up puts them closer to whales and dolphins. Now, new fossil finds start to solve the mystery of the evolutionary history of the “river horse”. more

Much Deeper Insight

Red(March 13th, 2015) On Monday, the Danish Grete Lundbeck European Brain Research Foundation announced the winners of the 2015 Brain Prize. Congratulations to Winfried Denk, Arthur Konnerth, Karel Svoboda and David Tank. more

Supermaterial Joins the War

Red(March 10th, 2015) So far only known to be valuable to physicists and material scientists, graphene slowly finds its way into biomedical labs, too. Manchester scientists discovered that graphene oxide specifically targets and kills cancer cells. more

Turkish Research Delight

Red(March 6th, 2015) As one of the few lucky winners of an EMBO Installation Grant, Günes Özhan is ready to push biomedical science in Turkey. Fortunately, a new research centre, the Izmir Biomedicine and Genome Center (iBG-izmir) has recently been founded in the western part of the country. more

Work Enthusiasm or Authorship Abuse? (Part 2)

Red(March 3rd, 2015) How many research publications can a scientist claim to author in a year? Can we really be the author of one paper a week, every week, for years on end? Jeremy Garwood looks at authorship abuse in biomedical science. more

Work Enthusiasm or Authorship Abuse? (Part 1)

Red(February 27th, 2015) How many research publications can a scientist claim to author in a year? Can we really be the author of one paper a week, every week, for years on end? Jeremy Garwood looks at authorship abuse in biomedical science. more

Bad Modelling Job?

Red(February 24th, 2015) In recent years, the trillions of bacteria living in our guts have risen from obscurity to stardom. They are thought to affect almost everything, from our mood to health and disease. Studies often involve mice but are these rodents really an appropriate model? more

Motivating Institutions to Introduce RRI into their Strategies is a Major Challenge

Red(February 20th, 2015) Bringing together scientists, citizens, policy makers and businesses to solve society’s complex problems is the goal of Responsible Research and Innovation, RRI. The abstract concept now gets more specific. We talked to RRI Tools co-ordinator, Ignasi López Verdeguer. more

Illegal Drugs: Time for a Re-think?

Red(February 17th, 2015) In the 1960s and 70s, the United Nations compiled a list of chemicals harmful to health if used by self-medication. Criticism starts to grow among the medical community who sees this legislation as a barrier to research. more

"Nature Relies on an Interplay of 'Noise' and Quantum Mechanics"

Red(February 13th, 2015) Recently, about 40 researchers gathered in Brussels to discuss an emerging subfield of biology, quantum biology. Martin Plenio, physicist at the University of Ulm, explains how quantum biology can give us new insight into a world we thought we knew. more

A Matter of Interpretation

Red(February 10th, 2015) "Functional" - what does it mean? According to the Oxford Dictionary, "functional" is defined as "of or having a special activity, purpose or task". DNA is functional, too. But how is controversially discussed. A new paper adds more fuel to the fire. more

"Cryo-EM will Make a very big Difference"

Red(February 6th, 2015) It is rumoured that structural biology is undergoing a revolution. Once dominated by X-ray crystallography methods, cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) is now transforming the field. Sjors Scheres is one of the driving forces behind this revolution. more

Fighting Irreproducibility

Red(February 3rd, 2015) Considering publishing your next research article in one of the PLoS journals? If your answer is yes, then you should know about the launch of a new initiative at PLoS Biology and PLoS Genetics – the Research Resource Identification Initiative. more

Is Ribosome the new 42?

Red(January 30th, 2015) Some 3.5 billion years ago, the first organisms embraced life on planet earth. A primitive envelope girded a primitive genome to make the simplest living cell. But could a loner genome account for all the complexity of the living cell – survival, sustenance and procreation? more

Treats for Reviewers and Editors

Red(January 27th, 2015) Undue incentive or overdue reward? The not-for-profit, multidisciplinary journal Collabra, belonging to the University of California Open Press, plans to remunerate its reviewers and editors with some pocket money. more

The Secret of a Longer Life? Kill your Unfit Cells.

Red(January 23rd, 2015) If you had the choice, would you like to live until you’re 130 years old? New research in fruit flies shows that manipulating a single gene can extend their life span up to 60%, suggesting that living well into your hundreds might become a reality in the foreseeable future. more

Scratching the Surface in Cancer

Red(January 20th, 2015) Patients suffering from epidermolysis bullosa, a chronic skin-blistering condition, are highly vulnerable to skin cancers. New research sheds light on the mechanism underlying tumour progression in skin abrasions and how antibiotics may serve as a surprising solution. more

The Lonely Mouse

Red(January 16th, 2015) Danish researchers found that single-housed lab mice show signs of depression. This might affect their use in clinical studies and could help explain why so many candidate drugs fail in humans. Did we underestimate the complexity of this model organism? more

On Top of the World

Red(January 13th, 2015) What has been your scientific highlight of 2014? Many journals, publisher, bloggers and Lab Times editors gave thought to this question. Here are some of their answers. more

Confessions of a Postdoc (22): Scientists without Borders

Red(January 9th, 2015) Since 2010, Anjana Nityanandam has shared her inner thoughts, experiences and feelings that come with being a postdoc. Here are her latest insights into the world of a research scientist that many are probably all too familiar with. more

Dispatches from the US (4)

Red(January 5th, 2015) In December, US science heralded biosciences research into outer space, with rodents and microbes switching their earthly home labs for the ISS; James Watson sells his prized possession and we take a peep into some of the starry discoveries in the States. more


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